Posts Tagged ‘health care law’

7 Health Insurance Issues to Follow This Year

Sunday, April 6th, 2014

Kaiser Health News and USA Today collaborated on an article asking “What Happens Next On The Health Law?“.  Julie Appleby, Mary Agnes Carey, and Phil Galewitz gave us seven things to watch for between the end of enrollment on March 31 and the beginning of the next enrollment period in November.  This health care reform has been hotly debated for the length of a presidential term already and will likely continue to be a hot topic into the future.  Now that the first enrollment period has come to an end, we can finally start to measure some of the successes, failures, and changes that have actually occurred.  Before that, it was just speculation.

Everyone wants to know how many people actually signed up for health insurance plans after the law took effect.  We certainly don’t have any concrete answers yet, but President Obama says that early indications show 6 million people signed up.  This doesn’t take into account those Americans who got health insurance outside of the government agencies or with insurance companies.  The March deadline was also loosened for people who tried to sign up and had website issues.  It could be a month or so before we get concrete numbers.  For the law to work ideally, young and healthy individuals needed to sign up.  So who actually did enroll?  Around one-quarter of them were in the targeted demographic of 18 to 34.  The majority of new enrollees were aged 35 and up and were female.  Health insurance rates are based on state enrollment though, so it’s more important to determine who signed up in each state.  Those states who had more older, sicker individuals sign up might see increasing health insurance rates.

The biggest question to be answered is whether or not the law actually affected the number of uninsured Americans overall.  There are no clear statistics to answer this question just yet.  The Kaiser Family Foundation says that they are pretty sure the uninsured rate has gone down, based on a Gallup poll and McKinsey phone survey.  That last survey found that 27% of those who signed up for health insurance previously did not have any.  Everyone will be closely tracking final figures on this topic.  You will not find the same plans and prices when the next enrollment period begins on November 15.  Insurance companies will have to go over all of the costs and figures before they release their new selections next fall.  It’s too early to determine whether Medicaid participation will grow, but that is something that a lot of people are watching this year.  There has been a lot of political fighting over Medicaid expansion, so it is being closely monitored.

Many of us are wondering what might happen with employer sponsored health insurance.  Employers who already offer it will continue to do so, but will likely pass cost increases onto employees through increasing deductibles and co-pays.  Employers with less than 50 employees do not have to offer them health insurance.  Those with 50-99 employees have to offer 70% of them insurance plans by 2016.  Companies with 100 or more workers have to offer 70% of them health insurance by next year.  Look out for coverage options relatively soon if you work for one of those companies.  Congressional elections will likely be affected by these health care issues in the near future.  You’ll probably see a lot of advertising and news time dedicated to health care reform issues this year.  If you are looking for a health insurance plan, find an affordable option here.  The next enrollment period for the government exchanges begins on November 15.

 

 

It’s March Madness for Health Insurance Sign-Ups As Well

Saturday, March 29th, 2014

Not only is it a big weekend for March Madness basketball, it’s a big weekend for the health insurance industry as well.  March 31 is the deadline to sign up for health insurance or else risk receiving a penalty by the government when you file your taxes next year.  As long as you have started filling out a health insurance application, there is a grace period until April 7 to finish filing your paperwork.  The Associated Press offered important information in their article, “Monday is the deadline to sign up for health law”.  Government reports say that more than 6 million people have already signed up for health insurance through the newly created marketplaces since they opened October 1.  That number doesn’t even take into account the number of people who have signed up for new health insurance plans outside of the marketplaces since the new law took effect.  Four out of five of the people signing up in the marketplace have gotten a government tax credit to help pay for their premium cost.

The federal government’s website has a deadline of midnight on March 31, but states that are running their own marketplaces might have different deadlines in place.  You can sign up online, by phone, or even in person because many local areas have sign-up centers.  Since we are down to the wire with sign-up time, there will probably be long wait times no matter which way to choose to sign up through Monday.  If you don’t qualify for a government tax subsidy, but want to get health insurance to follow the law, there are many more options for finding health insurance.  You can compare health rates for individual or family insurance plans here.

In Tennessee, there is a “Local push underway to get health insurance before (the) deadline“.  Local ABC News affiliate WATE reporter Kayla Strayer posted a list of locations where people in East Tennessee can receive free help from insurance agents.  One out of six people in Tennessee has been living without health insurance.  Most of these people say that they simply can’t afford it.  Insurance experts are helping many of these Tennesseans determine whether they qualify for government subsidies as well as helping them with the application process.  One volunteer says that you can see the relief on people’s faces when they find a health insurance plan that they can afford.  Many have been going without health insurance, and in turn doctor visits and tests, even though they know they need treatment.  Americans have to sign up for health insurance by March 31, or risk being charged a fee.  Fees are equal to 1% of your income, or $95 per adult and $50 per child.  Some Americans will be exempt from this insurance mandate.